WALTZ WITH BASHIR: Israel's Guilt and Oscar Bid !

Share/Save/Bookmark

WALTZ WITH BASHIR: Israel's Guilt and Oscar Bid !
by Darius Kadivar
30-Dec-2008
 

An animated documentary is receiving some of the best reviews of the year. Ari Folman's Waltz With Bashir, produced in Israel, tells of an Israeli man's tortured memories of his country's 1982 invasion of Lebanon and Sabra and Shatila Massacre.

They Say 'Art' and 'Cinema' in particular can change things and heal open scars ... Let's Hope so ...

Plot:

One night in a bar, an old friend tells director Ari about a recurring nightmare in which he is chased by 26 vicious dogs. Every night, the same number of beasts. The two men conclude that theres a connection to their Israeli Army mission in the first Lebanon War of the early eighties. Ari is surprised that he cant remember a thing anymore about that period of his life. Intrigued by this riddle, he decides to meet and
interview old friends and comrades around the world. He needs to discover the truth about that time and about himself. As Ari delves deeper and deeper into the mystery, his memory begins to creep up in surreal images.

Reviews:

An animated documentary -- seemingly a contradiction in terms -- is receiving some of the best reviews of the year. Ari Folman's Waltz With Bashir, produced in Israel, tells of an Israeli man's tortured memories of his country's 1982 invasion of Lebanon. It has elicted words like "riveting" (Joe Morgenstern, the Wall Street Journal), "astonishing ... searing ... altogether amazing" (A.O. Scott, the New York Times), "haunting" (Lou Lumenick, the New York Post), and "profoundly affecting," Rick Groen, the Toronto Globe and Mail. Groen's review takes up the issue inherent in a movie that uses animation to replace bloody reality. "All war movies face the endemic problem of how to dramatize war without aestheticizing it. Here, by beginning with an obvious layer of added artifice, the animation technique openly admits to that problem and, paradoxically, goes some way toward solving it, simply by accentuating the notion that nothing about war seems real, yet everything about war is real -- deadly real." Indeed, Scott in the New York Times observes that at the end of the film, the animation stops "and the audience is confronted with graphic, horrifying images of real dead bodies. This ending shows just how far Mr. Folman is prepared to go, not in the service of shock for its own sake, but rather in his pursuit of clarity and truth."

HQ Trailer:

 

Share/Save/Bookmark

more from Darius Kadivar
 
Arash Monzavi-Kia

Yes, Darius, there is no comparison between ...

by Arash Monzavi-Kia on

Nazi Germany and Israel. You are 100% right on that and against that blog. 

Arash M-K


Darius Kadivar

Your welcome Arash Jaan

by Darius Kadivar on

Very True and at the same time I wonder if under Nazi Germany a German Citizen could have made a film or documentary on what was going on in Auchwitz or Dachau or denounce the Nazi Propaganda with the same freddom as this director in regard to the Military Crimes commited by Israelian Troops ? I say this in regard to the very absurd comparison drawn by one of the fellow bloggers on this site:

http://iranian.com/main/node/51754

In anycase I truly hope that this cycle of blind violence will one day come to an end for it is the only alternative for a constructive future for everyone in the region.


Arash Monzavi-Kia

Thanks for sharing, Darius

by Arash Monzavi-Kia on

A fundamental flaw in most Israeli war action is that, they do not realize that their enemies are mostly created by their own war actions. The more they hit, the more they come; the more they kill, the more they make; the more they bomb, the more ferocious their enemies become.

Is there an end to this vicious circle of violence? Well, 60 years have taken us this far; let's see what the next 60 will bring! More of the same? Or worse? 

Arash M-K