MONARCHICAL REPUBLIC: Political Participation in Elizabethan England

Share/Save/Bookmark

MONARCHICAL REPUBLIC: Political Participation in Elizabethan England
by Darius Kadivar
03-Nov-2011
 

Prof Keith Wrightson of the Yale University History Department provides an overview of central political issues of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. In particular, Professor Wrightson highlights the shifts in political culture which occurred during the period, as ideas concerning political participation and the role of institutions such as Parliament expanded.

Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251)

David Starkey Depicts Queen Elizabeth Ist Coronation:

Clip on Elizabeth Tudor's accession to the throne and her coronation. From David Starkey's documentary on Elizabeth I

(NOTE : To Watch Double Click Here)

Elizabeth I's 'Golden Speech' to Parliament

Elizabeth's last speech to Parliament made in November 1601. It became known as the 'Golden Speech', one of her most notable speeches along with the infamous words she spoke at Tilbury in 1588.

(NOTE : To Watch Double Click Here)

Trailer of Elizabeth: The Golden Age

The sequel follows Queen Elizabeth's (Cate Blanchett) reign of England as she matures and faces marital expectations, an assination plot, and the Spanish Armada.

About the Lecture:

Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251)

In this lecture Professor Wrightson provides an overview of central political issues of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. He discusses the Queen's personal character and identity-forming experiences (and the challenges posed by her gender), the manner in which she interacted with her political advisors(notably William Cecil) and addresses the foreign and domestic crises which impacted her rule (such as the on going threat posed by the claims of Mary, Queen of Scots to the English throne and England's increasingly tense relationship with Spain). In particular, Professor Wrightson highlights the shifts in political culture which occurred during the period, as ideas concerning political participation and the role of institutions such asParliament expanded. He introduces Patrick Collinson's notion of theElizabethan regime as something of a "monarchical republic," with the Queen exercising power in cooperation with political stake holders whose ideas about governance were informed by both their Protestant convictions and classical political principles. This course was recorded in Fall 2009.

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

http://open.yale.edu/courses

About the Lecturer:

Keith Wrightson

Randolph W. Townsend Jr. Professor of History

Senior Essay Director, History

Office: JE L11

Phone: (203) 432-7248

Email: keith.wrightson@yale.edu

Keith E. Wrightson, Randolph W. Townsend Jr. Professor of History, is a scholar of early modern British history. His books, which have been credited for their novel approach to English social and cultural history, include Poverty and Piety in an English Village: Terling, 1525-1700 (co-authored with DavidLevine), The Making of an Industrial Society. Whickham 1560-1765 (also with Levine), English Society, 1580-1680 and Earthly Necessities. Economic Lives in Early Modern Britain. He is a contributing editor of The Illustrated Dictionary of British History and co-editor of The World We Have Gained: Histories of Population and Social Structure. Essays Presented to Peter Laslett on His 70th Birthday. Wrightson has also contributed chaptersto numerous books.

Wrightson earned his BA, MA and PhD from Cambridge University and began his teaching career at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, where he was a lecturer inmodern history 1975-1984. He returned to Cambridge in 1984, serving as the University Lecturer in History and later as director of studies in history and a reader in English social history. He became a full professor of social history there in 1998 and joined the Yale faculty a year later.

The historian has held visiting professorships at the University of Alberta and the University of Toronto, among others, and has been an invited lecturer at universities and in conferences throughout Europe, Canada, Australia, China,Russia and the United States. He was the James Ford Special Lecturer at the University of Oxford in 1993 and presented the British Academy's Raleigh Lecture in the fall of 2005.

At Yale,Wrightson has served as director of undergraduate studies in history and has chaired the Renaissance Studies Program. He has also served on a number of University advisory boards.

In 2001, Wrightson was awarded the John Ben Snow Prize, presented by the North American Conference on British Studies. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the British Academy. He serves on the editorial boards of several scholarly journals.

Related Blogs:

British Monarchy Removes Gender Rules Regarding Royal Succession

Press TV' Investigates' Prince Charles 'Right To Veto' Laws

How Truly Democratic And Stable Is The British Monarchy?

RESTORATION:Britain's 'Glorious Revolution' of 1688 and the 'Bill of Rights'

Related Constitutionalist Blogs:

How Genuinely Democratic and Representative was the Parliament in Pahlavi Iran ?

PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY: First Public Gathering of the Iranian Majlis (1906)

Cyrus Amir-Mokrion Pros and Cons of 1906 Constitution

Political Pluralism and Freedom of Press in Pahlavi Iran

Daryoush Homayoun’sLast Interview on Andisheh TV (2011)

Daryoush Homayoun: Freedom of Press During Pahlavi Era Vs. IRI Era

Share/Save/Bookmark

more from Darius Kadivar
 
Mash Ghasem

Hear, hear.

by Mash Ghasem on

And correct you are sir. But you still haven't told us how Liz dealt with participation of the Irish in the 'republic?'


Darius Kadivar

Folks If you've got nothing to say in regard to the blog posted

by Darius Kadivar on

Please Refrain from making distracting comments ...

I have no problem with people expressing their opposite and contradictory views or even making fun and even trashing what is being posted here particularly if they disagree with the content. That is how things are on a Free Forum.

I don't even have a problem if you feel to humor it in a way which relates to the subject at hand.

But I would appreciate a minimum of respect for the effort put into sharing this blog of academic interest with the readers and viewers on IC.

Thank you in advance,

DK 

 


Mash Ghasem

....

by Mash Ghasem on

It's still there bro. Me wrote it under the picture itself, not the general area.

I liked that music video u posted yesterday, with the singer keep saying: "Don't do it!" It reminded me of Mahavsh and her description of walking in the park, Gardesh Toy Bagh,...


Faramarz

Mash Ghasem

by Faramarz on

This morning before I left the house, I saw a comment from you about the beautiful lips of a certain woman in a certain picture on the front page. I was all prepared to say a thing or two about it. But now that I am back, your comment is gone!

What gives my brother?


Mash Ghasem

The Luck of the Irish

by Mash Ghasem on


anglophile

We have had quite a few of them

by anglophile on

Assad's Syria. Kim Jon-Il's north Korea, even Bushes' America! All are Elizabethan devotees :) 

Mash Ghasem

After "Islamic Democracy," now we have "Monarchical Republic!"

by Mash Ghasem on

Pretty much like Hamleh Bakreh, Shahid Zendeh,...

Wasn't tis the same Liz that considered Catholics as heathens. Very participatory indeed. Unless you happen to be Irish, then....