Travel in Spain

From Karkheh

Iranian Film Festival

APRIL 26-MAY 23, 1996
WALTER READE THEATER AT LINCOLN CENTER
NEW YORK CITY


INTRODUCTION

In November 1992, the Film Society proudly introduced New York audiences to this vital new national cinema, sampling over a dozen films by Makhmalbaf, Kiarostami, Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Darius Mehrjui and others. Since then, Kiarostami's much-lauded "And Life Goes On" and "Through the Olive Trees" as well as "The White Balloon" scripted by Kiarostami, directed by Jafar Panahi have been stand-out features in the New York Film Festival. We are pleased to present a selection of brand new films from Iran's rising wave of first-rate filmmakers, as well as a rare retrospective of Kiarostami's mesmerizingly minimalist cinema.

Iranian cinema is not only a link among other arts but a bridge between despair and hope, devastation and survival, poverty and plenty, subject and object- and most importantly, between people.- Godfrey Chesire, "Where Iranian Cinema is," Film Comment, March-April 1993

The Film Society thanks the Farabi Cinema Foundation, Mr. Mohammad Atebbai, Mr. Ali R. Shoja Noori and Mr. Jamsheed Akrami for their generous help.


INFORMATION & TICKETS

Advance sales: Begin April 12 at the box office (212) 875-5600. Tickets by phone can be reserved beginning one week before the screening date.

Admission: $8.00 public, $5 Film Society members, $4 senior citizens (during weekday matinees).

Box office: Open daily, 1:30 pm to 15 minutes after the start of that day'sfinal screening (cash only).

Reserve by phone: Call 212-777-Film. For fastest service, use 'select theater'option, then enter the Walter Reade Theater express code #954 followed bycredit card number ($1.25 service charge/per ticket).


SCHEDULE INFORMATION

Screening schedules are subject to change. For up-to-date schedule information, call the box office at (212) 875-5600, 24 hours a day. Or check the Walter Reade Theater's ad in the Friday New York Times movie section for up-to-date schedules through the weekend.


DIRECTIONS

The Walter Reade Theater is at Lincoln Center: 165 West 65th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues (adjacent to the Julliard School and Alice Tully Hall). Take the escalator on the northwest corner of Broadway and 65th Street to the plaza level. By subway: take (1/9) to 66th Street/Lincoln Center. By car: indoor parking available directly below the theater on West 65th Street. By bicycle: outdoor parking racks in view of security guards.


RECENT IRANIAN CINEMA

(Note: Directors will be present at screenings marked with *. )

THE SPOUSE / Hamsar
Mehdi Fakhimzadeh, 1994; 100 minutes
Actress Fatemeh Motamed-Aria surely deserved the Best Actress prize at the 1994 Fajr Film Festival for her performance as a resourceful factory manager in this surprising comedy that challenges traditional notions about male superiority in Iranian culture. Shirin (Motamed-Aria)- along with her husband (Mehdi Hashemi)- works in a pharmaceutical factory, where one day she exposes a connection to the black market in medicine. Naturally, her subsequent promotion makes for difficulties at home. Writer-director Fakhimzadeh has crafted a funny audience-pleaser that mixes social commentary with a positive vote for female competence.
Friday, April 26: 2 pm
Saturday, April 27: 6:30 pm*
Thursday, May 2: 9:30 pm

PARI
Dariush Mehrjui, 1995; 115 minutes
In Hamoon (1990), director Mehrjui took on the subject of intellectual confusion and disillusionment in a remarkably cinematic treatment; in that film, the protagonist sends a copy of J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey to his lover. It is this book that shapes Pari, movie and character. A young girl, a student of literature, wrestles with a spiritual crisis after reading the story of a 5th-century mystic who lost everything in a fire- the book is a legacy from Assad, Pari's older brother, who committed suicide by burning himself alive. While her second brother Safa remains a recluse in the country, her youngest sibling Dadashy tries to dissuade her from following Assad's path and to resurrect her taste for life. Niki Karimi, who has appeared in previous works by Mehrjui, turns in a remarkable performance as Pari.
Friday, April 26: 4 and 8:45 pm
Saturday, April 27: 9 pm
Friday, May 17: 2 and 6:15 pm

THE JOURNEY / Safar
Alireza Raisian, 1995; 96 minutes
Scripted by Abbas Kiarostami five years ago, The Journey is Raisian's second film: 'With all the respect I feel for Kiarostami and his works, I tried to remain independent.' In this unconventional tale, Farhad Sadri and his family escape the missile attacks on Tehran during the Gulf War, taking refuge in northern Iran. The journey to sanctuary takes some shocking and mysterious turns, though the strengths of the film lie in the apparently ordinary moments out of which significance is richly mined.
Sunday, April 28: 4 pm*
Monday, April 29: 4* and 8:30* pm

THE BLUE-VEILED aka THE BLUE SCARF / Rousari-abi
Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, 1995; 85 minutes
One of the first Iranian women to become a director, Bani-Etemad started out in documentary films, consistently focusing on marginal folk. (Her third film, Nargess, showcased in the Walter Reade's last program of recent Iranian films, dealt with star-crossed lovers.) Here, an elderly farmer and factory-owner falls in love with one of his workers after his wife's death. His daughters and in-laws are outraged, and the old man must choose between conformity and happiness. Bani-Etemad testifies that 'none of the characters in The Blue-Veiled were imaginary. I met them while working on my documentaries on the outskirts of Tehran- I formed the storyline from those real people and their experiences.'
Sunday, April 28: 9 pm
Monday, April 29: 2 and 6:15 pm

SALAAM CINEMA
Mohsen Makhmalbaf (writer-director-editor), 1995; 75 minutes
Everybody wants to be a movie star! When director Makhmalbaf placed an ad in Tehran, announcing that he would be holding auditions for 100 actors and actresses for a new film, 5,000 people showed up to turn the whole exciting affair into a virtual riot. Meant to be a birthday gift for flickers on their centenary, Salaam Cinema explores dreams and ideas about movies as various folk audition for those 100 parts. As fiction elides into fact and back again, the nature of filmmaking, the directorial character, and the faces and voices of Iranians- men, boys, and even women- become the magical stuff of movies. If the lovingly witty Salaam Cinema is a documentary, it's of an entirely new, intensely Iranian breed.
Friday, May 3: 2, 6 and 9:30 pm
Saturday, May 4: 4 and 7:45 pm

ZERO HEIGHTS / Bolabihay-e sefr
Hosseinali Lialastani (writer-director), 1994; 76 minutes
In Lialastani's first feature film, a writer (Shahrokh Ghiasi) comes in such violent conflict with the characters in one of his fictions that he finds himself wounded- in actuality. His family and friends begin to fear for his mental health, especially when it becomes clear that the writer has begun to identify- and clash- with the painter van Gogh (Parviz Pourhosseini) who, joined by a number of other artists, congregate in a world fabricated by the writer's imagination.
Sunday, May 19: 6 and 9:30 pm
Monday, May 20: 4 pm

THE ACTOR / Honarpisheh
Mohsen Makhmalbaf, 1993; 86 minutes
Akbar Abdi (Akbar Abdi), a popular film actor, has always wanted to appear only in serious art films, but financial problems and other difficulties have forced him into commercial productions. Just when Abdi vows never again to sell out, his wife (Fatemeh Motamed Aria) announces she's pregnant.
Sunday, May 5: 4 and 7:45 pm
Tuesday, May 7: 2 pm

KIMIA
Ahmad Reza Darvish, 1995; 92 minutes
At the onset of the Iran-Iraq war, Reza's pregnant wife is hospitalized for surgery. While Reza (Khosro Shakibai) is a POW, his wife dies giving birth to her child who is adopted by their obstetrician (Bita Farahi). Many years later, Reza returns to find his family dead or missing. If his search for his daughter Kimia (Zahra Oveisi) is successful, it can only mean heartbreak for all.
Sunday, May 5: 5:45 and 9:30 pm
Tuesday, May 7: 4 pm

THE FATEFUL DAY / Rouz-e vagh-e
Shahram Asadi, 1995; 105 minutes
This historical epic is set in the 15th century at the time of the martyrdom of Moslem bin Aghil. Typical of an Asadi film, Fateful Day focuses on the details of ritual and ceremony as it unreels the story of Abdollah (Shoja Noori), a recent convert to Islam, who seeks to marry Raheleh, a Muslim girl. After turning down Abdollah's proposal 38 times, Raheleh's father finally relents. Just as the wedding celebration is in full swing, Abdollah receives a Divine Call- and hesitating only a moment, he follows the summons.
Friday, May 10: 2, 6 and 9:30 pm
Saturday, May 11: 4 and 7:30 pm

THE BOOTS / Chakmeh
Mohammed Ali Talebi, 1993; 60 minutes
At the start of this poignant, yet humorous tale, a young girl counts the boots her mother has given her as the most beautiful things in the world. After she loses one of the precious boots, a chance encounter with a wandering boy makes her reconsider her definition of what's most important and desirable.
Friday, May 10: 4:15 and 8:10 pm
Saturday, May 11: 6:10 and 9:40 pm

TRAVELLERS / Mosaferan
Bahram Beizai, 1992; 90 minutes
Considered a member of the vanguard of Iranian cinema and theater, Beizai treats the Iranian passion play (Taízieh) as a living, non-Western theatrical form- with a great capacity for depicting modern subjects. In this spare yet allusive anecdote, a young woman prepares for her marriage in Tehran. Her elder sister, who has been living out in the provinces, travels to the capital to join the wedding party. When she is killed in an auto accident, the wedding becomes a funeral, and the fate of the young couple is quite lost sight of in the general grief.
Sunday, May 12: 4 and 7:30 pm
Monday, May 13: 4 and 7:45 pm

END OF CHILDHOOD / Payan e-koudaki
Kamal Tabrizi,* 1994; 77 minutes
A family of four are building a new house just when their country is invaded. Abandoning the house, they leave town, along with many other terrified citizens, crowding along a main road under constant enemy fire. After their pickup truck breaks down, the father (Jahangir Almasi) sets out for water, and does not return. In a literal rite of passage, his son must now bear the burden of looking after the family.
Saturday, May 4: 6:00 pm
Sunday, May 12: 5:45 and 9:15 pm
Monday, May 13: 2, 6 and 9:30 pm

THE QUIET HOME / Khaneh khalvat
Mehdi Sabbaghzadeh, 1993; 107 minutes
Amir Jadaleddin, an irascible old journalist-storyteller (veteran actor Ezzatollah Entezami), doesnít want to stop writing, although times have changed and his style has gone out of fashion. His wife and his editor advise dignified retirement, his children have moved to faraway countries, and his greedy neighbors are eyeing his crumbling house and land. But Amir's soul and his way with words are uplifted as he tries to aid Narges, a young woman searching for a husband lost in action. (Best Cinematography at the Harare, Zimbabwe International Film Festival.)
Friday, May 17: 4:15 and 8:30 pm

FROM KARKHEH TO RHEIN / Az Karkheh ta Rhein
Ebrahim Hatamikia* (writer-director), 1993; 90 minutes
Two years after the Iran-Iraq conflict, Saeed, a victim of chemical warfare, arrives in Germany seeking medical treatment for his badly damaged eyes. There, he is reunited with a sister, now married to a German, whom he hasnít seen for years. The two share a powerful nostalgia for a common past, but the legacy of war threatens yet another separation.
Saturday, May 4: 9:30 pm
Sunday, May 19: 4 and 7:45 pm
Monday, May 20: 2 pm

FOR THE SAKE OF HANIYEH / Bekhater-e Hanieh
Kiumars Pour-Ahmad,* 1995; 85 minutes
In the village of Tangak, the citizens believe that Captain Olov is responsible for the deaths of a group of fishermen, and rise in revolt against him, forcing the Captain to flee with his family. Much later, after the Captain's death, young Bashiru (Abbas Alizadeh) decides to return to Tangak to prove his own worth in the place where his father lost his honor. Pour-Ahmed enjoyed great success with an extremely popular TV series, The Adventures of Majid; so much so that this is his first film to escape that seriesí subject matter. His young Bashiru, brand-new to the screen and with almost no acting experience, turns in an impressive performance as a boy who willingly passes through ritual fire to heal his crippled sister.
Friday, May 3: 4 and 7:45 pm

All shows begin at 2:00 pm
$2 for kids and adults!

IRANIAN ANIMATION
(77 minutes)
In this adventurous collection of Iranian animation an alarm clock wants to sleep in and relies on a rooster to wake it...two town rulers start a fight over a bird, leaving it up to the children to find a solution...a red string doll comes to life and attempts to create the perfect play-mate...and in the spectacular Jewel Mountain a boy explores a huge mansion owned by a jeweller, and finds much more than he expects. These and other works are engagingly done with traditional drawings, yarn-come-to-life, and puppetry.
Saturday and Sunday, April 27 and 28
Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and5
Saturday, May 11

TICK TACK
Mohammad-Ali Talebi, 1994, 63 minutes
Hassan and Saeed are nine-year-old school friends who both excel at telling time. But their friendship is strained one day when Hassan is awarded a class prize, a beautiful watch, and Saeed is not! Hassan agrees to let Saeed at least show the watch to his grandfather, who he is living with. But grandfather misunderstands the situation, and in thinking it is Saeed who won the prize, locks it up for safekeeping. Good will and fragile egos are tested as the two friends try to resolve this awkward development.
Sunday, May 12
Saturday/Sunday, May 18 and 19
Saturday/Sunday, May 25 and 26


ABBAS KIAROSTAMI

Born in 1940, Abbas Kiarostami studied painting at Tehran University's Faculty of Fine Arts, then got into the business of making commercials. His apprentice work was impressive, and looked like 'Western movies, meaning,' Kiarostami says, 'they looked chic and were technically well-made.' In 1969, the young director was recruited to help set up a film division at the Center for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults.

Kiarostami's first work, Bread and Alley, was also the Center's debut as a film production unit. (The man who scripted The White Balloon is also an illustrator of children's books.) Kiarostami's films are often called 'docudramas,' for they evolve out of actual events, real characters, unedited time. But the Kiarostami touch turns the everyday- slowly, surreptitiously- into a kind of magical, even mystical embroidery, or perhaps something like a Persian tile-design, intricate, intertwining, suggestive in miniature of the vital shape and movement of the very cosmos. His minimalist approach to the world he frames often turns on repetition and variation, playing out incremental refrains with mesmerizing grace. Traffic cops, toothaches, homework, earthquakes, meta-cinematic quest and romance- all is grist for Kiarostami's cinematic clockwork. There's delicate, yet tough truth- and beauty- galore in this Iranian director's vision, for those Western eyes still able to apprehend movies as something more than roller-coaster rides. Join us for a rare screening of nearly all of Abbas Kiarostami's internationally acclaimed work.

KIAROSTAMI FILMS

THE TRAVELLER / Mosafer
(1972; 72 minutes)
Qasem prefers football to homework, and when he hears that the national team is to play in Tehran, he is determined to play hookey and go. By robbing his parents, swindling his schoolmates, and selling off his own team's gear, he manages a ticket and travelling expenses. However, the grand trip doesnít quite turn out as planned, to Qasem's chagrin.

with
SO I CAN / Manam mitunam
(1975; 3.5 minutes)
Two little boys sit watching a cartoon featuring animals. With each scene, one of them pipes out, 'I can, too,' then mimes the animalsí behavior. But the two are struck dumb at the sight of a bird in flight.

with
REGULAR OR IRREGULAR / Be tartib ya bedun-e tartib
(1981; 17 minutes)
A sense of order makes for good social organization. To demonstrate this axiom, Kiarostami presents a series of playlets in groups of twos. A single action is first performed in an organized manner, then again in an anarchic fashion. But the film crew has a time of it trying to organize the chaos!
Wednesday, May 1: 2, 5:45 and 9:15 pm
Thursday, May 2: 3:30 and 7 pm

FELLOW CITIZEN / Hamshahri
(1983; 52 minutes)
Caught up in Tehran's insane bottlenecks and gridlocks, a traffic cop tries to enforce rules and regulations. Having done so, he then proceeds to demonstrate the flexibility of the law and the flexibility of...the traffic cop! Kiarostami, who was a traffic cop in his youth, exploits this situation's inherently comic possibilities.

with
TOOTHACHE / Dandan-dard
(1980; 23 minutes)
From father to son, dental hygiene has always been neglected in Mohamed Reza's family. Result: the father and grandfather both wear dentures. Mohamed himself is taken with a violent toothache that leads to his being dismissed from school. At the hospital, a specialist gives some advice in the art of dental care.
Wednesday, May 1: 4 and 7:45 pm
Thursday, May 2: 2, 5:45

WHERE IS THE FRIEND's HOUSE?/ Khaneh-ye dust kojast?
(1987; 90 minutes)
Awarded the Bronze Leopard at the 1989 Locarno Film Festival, Where Is the Friend's House? confirmed Kiarostami as Iran's most acclaimed director. He frequently uses children as protagonists- and his treatment of them is always enlightening- yet through them he embraces the human condition in general. Though his kidsí worlds are almost mystically charged with significance, they are also grittily realistic. (Kiarostami scripted Jafar Panahi's wonderful The White Balloon.) Here we follow a boy who wanders through the streets of a northern Iranian village as he tries to return a crucial notebook to his best friend. In his quest, he finds himself in places and moments of great beauty and wonder. This simple, lyrical tale is drawn from a poem by poet-philosopher Sohrab Sepehri.

with
BREAD AND ALLEY / Nan va kucheh
(1970; 10 minutes)
A little boy makes his way home clutching a loaf of bread. In an alley, he finds a stray dog blocking his way. Stymied, the boy tries to follow an old man, who sets off in the wrong direction. So the child decides to pacify the dog by throwing him a piece of bread.
Wednesday, May 8: 2, 6 and 10 pm
Thursday, May 9: 4 and 8 pm

FIRST GRADERS / Avaliha
(1985; 85 minutes)
An Iranian elementary school in the mid-80s: whenever a conflict breaks out, the students involved are sent to the principal, who questions them in order to bring each around to recognizing his share of blame. We follow the procession of students who have been caught being disruptive, fighting or calling one another names. The same ritual (questions, confessions, repentance) is repeated with some variations, and intercut with another highly ritualized process: the 15 minutes of morning gymnastics.

with
THE CHORUS / Hamsorayan
(1982; 17 minutes)
A deaf old man wearing a hearing aid is walking in the streets of Rasht. When the surroundings get too noisy, he turns off his sound. Unfortunately, when he returns home, he doesnít hear his granddaughter, home from school, vainly ringing the doorbell. A chorus of children gathers to penetrate the old man's silence.
Wednesday, May 8: 4 and 8 pm
Thursday, May 9: 2 and 6 pm

CLOSE-UP / Nama-ye nazdik
(1990; 100 minutes)
The greatest documentary on filmmaking I have ever seen. - Werner Herzog A young man introduces himself as Mohsen Makhmalbaf (celebrated director of Salaam Cinema), and enters intimately into the life of a family, under the pretext that he's scouting locations for a film project. Deeply suspicious of the stranger, the father investigates their guest, leading to the con-artist's exposure and arrest. At this stage, Kiarostami and his actual film crew enter the story to film the imposter's trial. Events preceding the young man's arrest are reconstructed, starring the real people who played parts in the scenario. An insightful exploration of the nature of truth and movie-dreams with a distinctly off-beat sense of humor.

with
SOLUTION / Rah-e hal
(1978; 11 minutes)
A youth trying to hitchhike back to his car with a new tire canít get a ride even on a heavily traveled road. Fed up, he decides to walk, rolling the tire ahead of him. His journey takes him through a countryside so lovely he arrives at his destination utterly enchanted.
Tuesday, May 14: 2 and 6 pm
Wednesday, May 15: 4 and 8 pm
Thursday, May 16: 2 and 9:15 pm

HOMEWORK / Mashq-e shab
(1990; 86 minutes)
According to Kiarostami, Homework is not a film, but rather a filmed inquiry motivated by the Iranian educational problems his own children brought home every night from school. Young scholars are questioned by the director himself: backs to the wall, framed in close-up, the kids face Kiarostami's camera and talk about excessive amounts of homework, the allure of TV cartoons, and the punishment that results from temptation.

with
BREAKTIME / Zang-e tafrih
(1972; 10 minutes)
Punished for having smashed a window with his ball, a child has to stand in the school hallway. When school lets out, he heads home but find his way blocked by a football game. He manages to get through, but then follows a bumpy road that takes him to the outskirts of the city.
Tuesday, May 14: 4 pm
Wednesday, May 15: 2, 6 & 10 pm
Thursday, May 16: 4 pm

THROUGH THE OLIVE TREES / Zir-e derakhtan-e zeytun
(1994; 103 minutes)
And Life Goes On (NYFF ë92) followed a director looking for a former child actor of his in a remote mountain region after an earthquake, learning about life from the poor people he meets. In Through the Olive Trees, the self-sufficient sequel to And Life Goes On, Kiarostomi looks at the making of the first film from another- quietly, cumulatively hilarious- angle, evoking at times an Iranian variant on Truffaut's Day for Night. A lovely comedy of errors about filmmaking in which the director's remarkable feeling for landscape and his warm, witty grasp of human idiosyncrasy are as sharp as ever. (A NYFF '94 hit.)
Sunday, April 28: 6:30 pm*
Tuesday, May 21: 2 pm
Wednesday, May 22: 4 and 8 pm
Thursday, May 23: 2 and 10 pm

AND LIFE GOES ON / Va zendegi edameh darad
(1992; 91 minutes)
After the earthquake that devasted northern Iran in 1990, a filmmaker and his son try to drive to the village of Koker, located in the heart of the devastated area. Searching for two youths who played in his film Where Is the Friend's House,? the director runs into all sorts of difficulties as he shows stills from Kiarostami's film in hopes of someone identifying the lost boys. At last, the artist comes to understand that life- like the movies- reels splendidly on.

with
TWO SOLUTIONS FOR ONE PROBLEM / Do rah-e hal baray-e yek masaleh
(1975; 4Omega minutes)
Two young boys are classmates: when Nader returns his friend's notebook, the cover of which he has accidently torn, the other is faced with two possibilities. Either he can quickly take revenge, or the two can look for a solution together, glue the book back together and remain good pals.
Friday, April 26: 6:30 pm*
Tuesday, May 21: 4 pm
Wednesday, May 22: 2, 6 and 10 pm
Thursday, May 23: 4 pm


SCHEDULE BY DATE

Friday, April 26
2:00 THE SPOUSE
4:00 PARI
6:30 AND LIFE GOES ON
8:45 PARI

Saturday, April 27
2:00 IRANIAN ANIMATION
4:00 HOMEWORK w/ BREAKTIME
6:30 THE SPOUSE
9:00 PARI

Sunday, April 28
2:00 IRANIAN ANIMATION
4:00 THE JOURNEY
6:30 THROUGH THE OLIVE TREES
9:00 THE BLUE-VEILED

Monday, April 29
2:00, 6:15 THE BLUE-VEILED
4:00, 8:30 THE JOURNEY

Wednesday, May 1
2:00, 5:45, 9:15 THE TRAVELLER w/ SO I CAN w/ REGULAR OR IRREGULAR
4:00, 7:45 FELLOW CITIZEN w/ TOOTHACHE

Thursday, May 2
2:00, 5:45 FELLOW CITIZEN w/ TOOTHACHE
3:30, 7 THE TRAVELLER w/ SO I CAN w/ REGULAR OR IRREGULAR
9:30 THE SPOUSE

Friday, May 3
2:00, 6:00, 9:30 SALAAM CINEMA
4:00 and 7:45 FOR THE SAKE OF HANIEH

Saturday, May 4
2:00 IRANIAN ANIMATION
4:00, 7:45 SALAAM CINEMA
6:00 END OF CHILDHOOD
9:30 FROM KARKHEH TO RHEIN

Sunday, May 5
2:00 IRANIAN ANIMATION
4:00, 7:45 THE ACTOR
5:45, 9:30 KIMIA

Tuesday, May 7
2:00 THE ACTOR
4:00 KIMIA

Wednesday, May 8
2:00, 6:00, 10:00 WHERE IS THE FRIENDíS HOUSE w/ BREAD AND ALLEY
4:00, 8:00 FIRST GRADERS w/ THE CHORUS

Thursday, May 9
2:00, 6:00 FIRST GRADERS w/ THE CHORUS
4:00, 8:00 WHERE IS THE FRIENDíS HOUSE w/ BREAD AND ALLEY

Friday, May 10
2:00, 6:00, 9:30 THE FATEFUL DAY
4:15, 8:10 THE BOOTS

Saturday, May 11
2:00 IRANIAN ANIMATION
4:00, 7:30 THE FATEFUL DAY
6:10, 9:40 THE BOOTS

Sunday, May 12
2:00 pm TICK TACK
4:00, 7:30 TRAVELLERS
5:45, 9:15 END OF CHILDHOOD

Monday, May 13
2:00, 6:00, 9:30 END OF CHILDHOOD
4:00, 7:45 TRAVELLERS

Tuesday, May 14
2:00, 6:00 CLOSE-UP w/ SOLUTION
4:00 HOMEWORK w/ BREAKTIME

Wednesday, May 15
2:00, 6:00, 10:00 HOMEWORK w/ BREAKTIME
4:00, 8:00 pm CLOSE-UP w/ SOLUTION

Thursday, May 16 2:00, 9:15 CLOSE-UP w/ SOLUTION 4:00 HOMEWORK w/ BREAKTIME

Friday, May 17
2:00, 6:15 PARI
4:15, 8:30 THE QUIET HOME

Saturday, May 18
2:00 TICK TACK

Sunday, May 19
2:00 TICK TACK
4:00, 7:30 FROM KARKEH TO RHEIN
6:00, 9:30 ZERO HEIGHTS

Monday, May 20
2:00 FROM KARKEH TO RHEIN
4:00 ZERO HEIGHTS

Tuesday, May 21
2:00 THROUGH THE OLIVE TREES
4:00 AND LIFE GOES ON w/ TWO SOLUTIONS FOR ONE PROBLEM

Wednesday, May 22
2:00, 6:00, 10:00 AND LIFE GOES ON w/ TWO SOLUTIONS FOR ONE PROBLEM
4:00, 8:00 THROUGH THE OLIVE TREES

Saturday, May 25
2:00 TICK TACK

Sunday, May 26
2:00 TICK TACK


OTHER WEB SITES OF INTEREST

http://www.MovieLink.com
Weekly film schedule; you can even charge tickets on-line!

http://www.NewYorkMall.com
Film Festival information, plus listings of places to dine, shop and visit in the Lincoln Center neighborhood.


Table of ContentsPrevious ArticleNext ArticleSend Comments

Last Updated: 11-May-96
Web Site Design by: Multimedia Internet Services, Inc. Send your Comments to: iranian@interport.net.
Copyright © 1996 Abadan Publishing Co. All Rights Reserved. May not be duplicated or distributed in any form.